Believing

But We’ve Always Done It That Way…

We can thank New Zealander George Vernon Hudson for coming up with the idea of Daylight Savings Time. He was an entomologist who liked the idea of having more daylight after he got off work. In 1895, he presented a paper to the local philosophical society. Three years later, he presented another paper, and the idea was adopted in New Zealand.A couple of years later, an Englishman named William Willett got to thinking what a shame at was that people slept later in the summertime. {With a nasty little anti-sleep attitude like that, that he and would rumble if I met him face to face.} He is described by Wikipedia as an avid golfer who disliked having his golf game cut short by early dusk. So he proposed the idea of tinkering with the clocks to his circle of friends. Then England was infected with the crazy notion of “saving daylight”.

So. We have a Kiwi who liked to collect bugs and a Brit who liked to play golf. They both though that more sunlight was a good way to extend their hobbies until later in the day.

That, my friends, is why we suffer the bi-annual aggravation known as Daylight Savings Time. Really? Really.

This research made me think about the traditions in life that we all adhere to in some form or another without questioning why. Whether it be our political party affiliations or our religious denominations, we all start out in life with preconceived notions about certain aspects in life because “that’s the way our parents did it.”

I think we adopt certain traditions out of sheer laziness. We never even think of doing things differently because that would require well, thinking. And, sadly, I’ve noticed lately that many people don’t leave enough time in their busy schedules to slow down long enough to think. About anything other than the next “To Do” on the list. (Hmmmm….This is a whole other post in itself…. Stay tuned!)

I am challenging myself today to think about the traditions or even thought patterns I hold so dear and ask myself, “Why?”

The area where I have struggled with the most in my adult life is judgmentalism. I was raised in a denomination of the Christian church that is infamous for the fire-and-brimstone version of the “Good News”. I say this tongue-in-cheek because, really? Preaching Hell and Damnation is going to, what? *Scare* people into Heaven??? Deep breath…  I digress…

It has been hard to fight thoughts that were ingrained in my mind from a very early age of what defines a “Sinner”. Because, as we all know, you can tell just by looking at someone if they are a “Sinner” or not. (half chuckle/half groan)

As I got older I was blessed by the revelation that EVERYONE IS A SINNER! NO ONE IS PERFECT. (All caps because this was news to me.) I thought only “bad” people were “Sinners” because there was a list of all the Do’s and Dont’s in the bible, right? So if I did all the Do’s and didn’t all the Don’ts, then I was going to Heaven, right? And by the same il-logic, people who didn’t live the way I did were going to Hell. I was living in my own Wemmicksville handing out stars and dots. [Side note: If you haven’t read the book by Max Lucado called “You are Special”, YOU MUST DO SO ASAP!]

Long story short: grace is the answer to the problem of legalism and judgmentalism. Extend to others the same grace that God extends to you. Period. Don’t over-think it. Just do it.

Good grief I could go on and on but I won’t.  Give grace freely. You’ll be glad you did.

“Do not judge according to appearance, but judge with righteous judgment.” ~ John 7:24

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2 thoughts on “But We’ve Always Done It That Way…”

  1. Thanks and YES! I want (for myself and my kids) to know exactly why I believe what I believe. Blind faith in *anything* is shallow and generally unsupportable. Thanks to mass media, we live in a world where most ideas are spoon-fed to us, and we take them into our minds as truth, most of the time without question. This scares the shizznit out of me! It's nice to know that there are still people out there like you who are thoughtful about what they assimilate into their minds. 😉

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  2. I try to challenge the traditions I was brought up with every day. Just to give myself a different perspective in life. Sometimes I change my views, and sometimes I do not. I don't want to go through life with someone elses ideals. I hope my children do the same. Awesome post x

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